Whales Wars Season 2, Episode 11: Overlooking a Forlorn Shore

I’ll have to admit that the Whale Wars season is dragging me under as it drags along.  The episodes seem to plod, and only deliver about five minutes actual excitement toward the end.  Even that is usually anticlimactic.  I don’t know how much more of this I will put up with, and making the same arguments to a bunch of irrational, shallow thinking tween-agers every week who do little more than throw out ad hominem attacks is also tiring.  I just hope the season is over soon. 

The new plan to interfere with the Japanese involves sailing the Steve Irwin directly between the Japanese harpoon vessel and the factory ship in order to sever the line transferring the dead whale to the factory ship.  This seems incredibly dangerous, but possibly effective.

For some reason, they moved ahead of the factory ship.  Paul decided to pull across its bow, and barely missed being crushed by it.  Make no mistake about it.  That would have been the end of the Steve Irwin.  I don’t understand what the point of the move was, but they then looped back around behind the factory ship, and forced the harpoon ship to back off.  This is the first successful thing that they have done all season, and they wasted no time patting themselves on the back.

The harpoon ship circled and pulled back into position, and Paul decided to try to sever the line.  They succeeded in throwing several bottles of the stinky acid on the stern desk of the harpoon ship, and then Paul, the great skipper, rammed the Japanese harpoon ship.  For all of you guys who keep defending the Sea Shepherds by asking what laws they have broken, here’s one: the purposeful or careless ramming of another ship on the high seas.  I think that’s illegal.

After determining that they weren’t sinking, the Sea Shepherds praised themselves for what they had done although they did not even stop it from transferring the whale to the other ship.  In the end, even they finally saw their own ineffectiveness.

After looking below decks, they found out that the bucket of bolts known as the Steve Irwin was leaking.  The holes were repaired.  I wonder if they even know how lucky they were.

When the issue blew up in the press, Paul Watson took the only tact he could.  He lied.

On the way back, a couple of the crew were married by Paul on a desolate little piece of rock in the middle of nowhere.  It was actually pretty cool, and almost made me like Paul and the Sea Shepherds, but not really.

In the end, they accomplished nothing.  Not one whale was saved, and the lives of many people were put at risk.  What a waste.

As they docked, the police were waiting for them, and a warrant was issued in conjunction with an investigation involving the collision.  In the end, I think it is the sad Australian government that will bare the responsibility for not prosecuting the Sea Shepherds over political reasons.  I would throw the book at them.